Eat, Sleep, Report, Repeat!

Repeaters are a visualisation feature introduced in v9.1.  They are effective when you want to repeat a formatted section of a report by one variable.  They can save so much time as you don’t have to go through the tedious, error-prone task of recreating the same section many times by copying and pasting manually.  Imagine the time you’d save setting the design up just once and have the repetition handled by XLCubed!

Here’s an example of a repeater:

Our repeater is based on an XLCubed grid, filtered by Geography, with a panel consisting of formulae with XLCubed In-Cell charts and PictureLinks.  Additionally, each panel is conditionally formatted, with the colouring based on ratio of 3-month and 12-month average sales.

The great thing about XLCubed Repeaters is that you can include any XLCubed or Excel content in them!

Let’s see how easy it is to design our repeater – click Visualise > Repeater on the XLCubed ribbon and in the Designer window define the hierarchy to be repeated by dragging it to the Repeater Setup area.  Similarly, you can also set up any additional filters.

Click OK and then set the content of the repeater by setting up the three key ranges:

  • Repeat range – The entire area required to generate the report for one repetition. It needs to include all the source data and formulae used in the area to be displayed – the area within the blue border below
  • Render range – the display area which will be repeated and shown in the final report – the area within red border
  • Input range – the location where the member parameter will be inserted by the repeater, the cell with a green border. This will be used as the selection criteria for XLCubed Grids or formulae within the ‘Repeat Range’.

You can move/resize the repeater, set borders and margins from the Appearance tab.

You can easily include more items in your repeater by moving them in the Render range.

Remember, you can use any Excel content – in the example below we have a standard Excel chart that we want to also include at the top of our repeater:

Drag the chart into the top of your Render Range (resize as necessary) and your chart now appears like this:

It’s as simple as that!  Set up your repeater once and no more worrying that you’ve missed vital bits of information!

For more details see the Repeaters page on our Wiki:  https://help.xlcubed.com/Repeaters

…and a YouTube video which runs through this example:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3hYF8vkz-M

For all you football fans out there, our blog on the Premier League transfer window also has an example highlighting the use of repeaters:  https://blog.xlcubed.com/2017/09/charting-the-premier-league-transfer-window/

As always we would love to hear your feedback!

Charting the Premier League Transfer Window

This summer English Premier league clubs spent more than ever before on player transfers, a staggering £1.47bn in total. Some spent a lot more than others, and while PSG are making the Financial Fair Play headlines globally, the EPL clubs as a group spent more than any other league.

There are lots of ways to analyse spending, and rather than write a detailed analysis or opinion piece (as I’d doubtless end up being biased), I’ve taken the opportunity to simply present the transfer activity in a few different visualisations and readers can draw their own conclusions.

The first is a card based approach, with one ‘card’ per club. For each club we can see

  • Overall transfer activity (total revenue + total income),
  • Net transfer activity (spending – revenue)
  • A customised bullet graph showing transfer Spending : Revenue
  • Bars by player, showing incoming players (spending) in red and player sales (i.e. revenue) in blue

We’ve had some internal debate, but as the focus is on spending, actual spending is shown as positive numbers (in red) and revenue is shown as negative (blue).

I initially built the view for one club, as below, and then used a new ‘Repeater’ feature being introduced to XLCubed later this year which was a big time saver.

The repeater allowed me simply to replicate that view for the other clubs as below rather than build it 20 times. More to come on that in the next few months.

Click for a larger view. (yes, it’s a chart of two halves…)

The clubs are ordered from top left to bottom right by overall Activity. Using that approach Manchester City are top as they not only bought heavily, but also had significant sales, as did Chelsea. Perhaps surprisingly Everton are third, both due to higher spending than normal and also the sale of Romelu Lukaku for an eye-watering £76m.

Note that while this view is in many ways a Small Multiple approach, the spending axes do not have a shared scale as that makes the charts difficult to read for clubs with a smaller spend.

If we had ranked by Net spend, Manchester United would actually be top as while City and Chelsea both spent more on players, United had very little sales to offset spending.

A few other points of interest are that both the North London clubs, Arsenal and Tottenham actually had a net income over this transfer window.

The club view below is ranked by net spend, and gives an easy comparison by club.

TreeMaps can also be interesting in this context. I’ve used them here to take a look at spending by club by position, and also by age band to provide a viewpoints on where clubs have been focusing on the pitch and whether on the short or long-term.

Taking playing position first, it varies significantly across clubs. Of the 3 largest spenders Manchester City have focused most heavily on defence, Chelsea on midfield and Manchester United on Forwards (albeit on 1 expensive forward).

Club Spending by Position

Looking at age band of the players purchased, as would probably be expected the 22-25 age band is the biggest spending category for most clubs. The players are established, but their expected peak years are still to come, and their market value will likely remain high if they were sold in a few years. All Liverpool’s purchases were in this age band.

Club Spending by Age band

Clubs looking for an instant fix may also invest in slightly older players already at their peak, and the 26-29 band has the second highest level of spend.

 

The transfer window could be charted endlessly, but in the end only time will tell if the clubs have spent wisely. Although wisely is a relative term in this context of course.