Visual Analytics for Excel

One of the biggest improvements in 9.2 is undoubtedly in the area of interactive charting. We’ve hugely extended the capabilities of Small Multiples through a new charting engine which brings rich interactive Visual Analytics to Excel (and web, and mobile…).

The ‘Small Multiple’ concept of many charts with a shared axis is very powerful, but in some cases users just need a single interactive chart and 9.2 caters for both scenarios. We have added zoom controls, sliders and a play axis to help users quickly focus in on and further explore specific areas of interest within the chart.

Zoom controls are available through the chart properties – right-click on anywhere in the chart and select Properties > Animation.

Let’s look at the Animation Zoom options in a bit more detail.

Initially you can select an area to zoom in on directly on the chart, however, you can also use the Zoom mode setting to select either a Slider or a Mini Chart.

Selecting a Slider adds a control to the bottom of the chart:

You can use the slider to narrow the display area, and then slide it across the range of data. This can be particularly useful in comparing relative trends across multiple charts.

Mini charts are another option available within Zoom mode – this shows a smaller version of the chart beneath the x axis and allows you to select an area to focus  in on, while retaining the smaller chart to retain the overall perspective.

File:SmallMultPreview small.gif

A Play control allows the user to see how values change over time.  To enable that open the Task Pane and add the required time hierarchy into the Animate chart by container.

Select the time periods you want to cycle through and click Play on the control beneath the x axis – it’s that easy! You can now step back through the periods one at a time, or replay the sequence as needed.

AnimateBy.gif

We hope you’ve found this blog useful and you’re inspired to visually explore your data with these new features!

As always, we value your feedback and any suggestions on how you would like to see our interactive charting extended further.

How’d you like that….displayed!

Today’s blog will show you a really quick and easy way to format your grid to show different display units.

This approach is ideal for dynamic Grids where the size of the values can vary considerably based on the selected filters, or where the user has drilled down to lower levels in the data. For example, if country level numbers are in hundreds of millions, but customer level numbers are in hundreds or thousands, it can be useful to have the ability to quickly change the display units.

Using this method, you can switch quickly to using different formats.  In our example we want to give the user the option to display the measure Reseller Sales Amount as Units, Thousands or Millions.

You can see we have a slicer to the right of the grid giving the user the choice of how to display the figures.

The slicer is based on an Excel range and is not directly linked to the grid.

A couple of things to note are the ‘Update range’ and ‘Activate XL3Link’ slicer settings are checked but more of that later.

‘Enabling Update Range with selection’ means that the slicer choice is written to a cell in the workbook – in our example it’s cell $M$17 (shown in red in screenshot below) – currently Millions are selected.

The other thing to note from the screenshot above are N13:N15.  These are a series of IF statements like below which will determine how the format sheet is updated:

=IF(M13=$M$17,”*”,”NOT SELECTED”)

As M13 is not equal to M17 the Units  row will be set to ‘NOT SELECTED’.

The row containing the ‘*’ is the format which we want to be applied to the Grid.

We now need to reflect that in the format sheet. This is done by first adding three rows for the relevant hierarchy, and setting the Excel numeric format column G to units on the first row, and then thousands and millions on the other two.

We can then set the ‘Member’ cells in column E as a simple formula referencing the table shown above. For example, the Unit’s member incell E50 in the XLCubedFormats sheet is set as =Sheet1!N13.  The same process is followed for Thousands and Millions.

With the format sheet as shown above, based on the user’s slicer selection, all members will then be displayed with the predefined Millions format as ‘*’ is a wildcard and will match on all the members in the Product Categories hierarchy.

The formatting for Units and Thousands will not be applied – unless of course you have a member in your hierarchy called ‘NOT SELECTED’!

As mentioned previously, our Excel slicer is not directly linked to the grid – we need a way to tell the grid to refresh each time the slicer choice changes.

This is where XLCubed’s ActivateXL3Link and XL3RefreshObjects comes into play.

Let’s look at the XL3ActivateLink first.  As you can see from our slicer screenshot above, our slicer is set to activate the XL3Link statement in cell I7.

I7 is set as =XL3Link(XL3Address($K$7),”Set Refresh”,,XL3Address($I$6),TRUE)

As you can see from the screenshot below it sets the target cell I6 to TRUE.

Cell J6 contains the formula =XL3RefreshSheetObjects(I6, “Sheet1”, TRUE).

As I6 is set to TRUE this forces a refresh of all objects in the sheet when the slicer choice changes.

It’s that simple – so the next time your Sales Team want their sales figures displayed as units but the CEO wants to see them expressed as millions impress them with this method!

Charting the Premier League Transfer Window

This summer English Premier league clubs spent more than ever before on player transfers, a staggering £1.47bn in total. Some spent a lot more than others, and while PSG are making the Financial Fair Play headlines globally, the EPL clubs as a group spent more than any other league.

There are lots of ways to analyse spending, and rather than write a detailed analysis or opinion piece (as I’d doubtless end up being biased), I’ve taken the opportunity to simply present the transfer activity in a few different visualisations and readers can draw their own conclusions.

The first is a card based approach, with one ‘card’ per club. For each club we can see

  • Overall transfer activity (total revenue + total income),
  • Net transfer activity (spending – revenue)
  • A customised bullet graph showing transfer Spending : Revenue
  • Bars by player, showing incoming players (spending) in red and player sales (i.e. revenue) in blue

We’ve had some internal debate, but as the focus is on spending, actual spending is shown as positive numbers (in red) and revenue is shown as negative (blue).

I initially built the view for one club, as below, and then used a new ‘Repeater’ feature being introduced to XLCubed later this year which was a big time saver.

The repeater allowed me simply to replicate that view for the other clubs as below rather than build it 20 times. More to come on that in the next few months.

Click for a larger view. (yes, it’s a chart of two halves…)

The clubs are ordered from top left to bottom right by overall Activity. Using that approach Manchester City are top as they not only bought heavily, but also had significant sales, as did Chelsea. Perhaps surprisingly Everton are third, both due to higher spending than normal and also the sale of Romelu Lukaku for an eye-watering £76m.

Note that while this view is in many ways a Small Multiple approach, the spending axes do not have a shared scale as that makes the charts difficult to read for clubs with a smaller spend.

If we had ranked by Net spend, Manchester United would actually be top as while City and Chelsea both spent more on players, United had very little sales to offset spending.

A few other points of interest are that both the North London clubs, Arsenal and Tottenham actually had a net income over this transfer window.

The club view below is ranked by net spend, and gives an easy comparison by club.

TreeMaps can also be interesting in this context. I’ve used them here to take a look at spending by club by position, and also by age band to provide a viewpoints on where clubs have been focusing on the pitch and whether on the short or long-term.

Taking playing position first, it varies significantly across clubs. Of the 3 largest spenders Manchester City have focused most heavily on defence, Chelsea on midfield and Manchester United on Forwards (albeit on 1 expensive forward).

Club Spending by Position

Looking at age band of the players purchased, as would probably be expected the 22-25 age band is the biggest spending category for most clubs. The players are established, but their expected peak years are still to come, and their market value will likely remain high if they were sold in a few years. All Liverpool’s purchases were in this age band.

Club Spending by Age band

Clubs looking for an instant fix may also invest in slightly older players already at their peak, and the 26-29 band has the second highest level of spend.

 

The transfer window could be charted endlessly, but in the end only time will tell if the clubs have spent wisely. Although wisely is a relative term in this context of course.

 

 

Icon-based Navigation and Filtering in XLCubed

Version 9 introduced an embedded icon library and XL3PictureLink, which together make the creation of icon-led navigation and filtering simple.

XL3PictureLink provides the same parameterised navigation capabilities which the XL3Link() formula has done for years, but with an added visual aspect. Users can choose from one of the thousands of icons provided, in any colour, or choose a custom image as required.

The images can then be used as an intuitive way for users to navigate to another sheet within the report, while passing a dynamic parameter to ensure the data is in-context. Alternately, where there are a small number of selection choices they can be used as visually appealing slicers.

Insert PictureLink is available from the Insert Formula tab on the XLCubed ribbon.

Click the drop-down and search for an appropriate image from the picture library – you can also specify the colour by clicking the Colour drop-down.

You then select the required image, and enter the destination cell location in the “Link to” box – this is the location where the user will be taken when they click on the image (can be the same sheet or a different sheet in the report).

You can also parameterise the image – “Value” is the content  which will be inserted into the cell specified in “Range to Set” (can be text or a cell reference).

To edit a Picturelink once it has been inserted, hold down Shift and then click the image.

Note that PictureLinks do not need to pass parameters – they can used as a simple link to another location:

Lastly, on web reports XL3PictureLink can also be used instead of the standard ‘Submit’ toolbar button.

There is more information on that here.

The Missing Link in Excel BI

When viewing a high level summary report or dashboard, users often want to delve into more detail on a specific area. In some cases that may be a drill down, in many others it may be to a different view of the data or to an entirely different report. In the XLCubed example below, users can link from any one of the summary KPIs to a detail report showing product level detail for the selected KPI.

This is a fairly common requirement in reporting. In a standard Excel context, it would be easy to add a hyperlink formula to jump across to another sheet, but that’s just part of what’s needed. In this example we need to link in the context of the selected KPI, otherwise we would need a separate sheet for product detail on each KPI, far from ideal, especially in row-dynamic reports.

This type of limitation is one reason why you’ll often see workbooks with huge numbers of worksheets, which become unwieldy and horrible to maintain.

We need hyperlink functionality but also an ability to pass parameters (and of course a way for the pivot table to accept the incoming parameter…).

XLCubed makes it straightforward for non-technical users to build this type of contextual linking into reports through the XL3Link() formula.  XL3Link has arguments which determine what is displayed in the cell, where it hyperlinks to, and what cell(s) parameters are passed from and to.

Unlike Pivot tables, XLCubed Grids and formulae can reference cell content as a filter, so the data on the ‘link to’ worksheet can update as soon as a new value is passed into the driving cell, retrieving the relevant data from whichever data source is involved.

The beauty of the approach is its simplicity. It’s something which most users can get to grips with quickly, and opens up huge flexibility in joined up reporting.

Last but not least, web and mobile deployment takes a matter of seconds. The report is published to XLCubed Web and from there browser and mobile app based users have access to the same report with the same chain of thought links. The links can be to different content in the same report, to a separate report, or a url to another application or website.

 

(This piece revisits content from our blog  from several years back the missing link part 1   . The business requirement it addresses is now even more common, and still one not handled in native Excel.)