Formatting Tables in v7

We’ve had some great feedback from our Newsletter announcing the release of v7.  A number of users have asked how we created the example in the Newsletter:

So,  today we’re going to show you how to achieve some of the formatting that is now available when using SQL tables in v7.

Let’s create a SQL table from Grids & Tables tab.  You’ll see the Create connection window:

Click Connect and you will see the databases you have access to….we’ll create our query based on Bicycle Sales and the fctData view.

 

Our SQL query returns the following data which is great but clearly is not that easy to read.

Let’s format this table.  We’ll get rid of any borders currently set on the workbook by going to the format sheet and using Format Cells on the default cell format cell as below:

 

Back to the table, right-click and refresh table.

 

Now for the actual formatting of the table. Let’s format entries in the first column cPOS. Right-click on Car and Bike Stores, right-click and select Format Column and let’s set the font to be bold, size 12 with a double border on both top and bottom.

Now the second column cProduct. Again right-click Format Column and set the top border to be double, bottom border thick and the font italic.

 

We now go to Properties tab and on Appearance tab set Sections as below:

Check the box ‘Use columns as sections’, the column count is 2 in our example and Display style is set as ‘Sections in separate rows’.

We’ll also hide the first row of the workbook showing the table column headings.
The report now looks like the screenshot below which is much easier to read.

 

Drive Excel Chart Min/Max from Range

How do I drive the min and max values of an axis from an Excel Range? This is one of the most commonly asked questions about Excel and with each new release it always amazes me that this feature hasn’t been added to the base product.

It’s a very common scenario to come across, you are building a line chart and it’s all looking ok until Excel suddenly decides to set the min value to 0, all of the detail is lost and you have gone from a nice detailed set of lines to a mishmash of colours a few pixels high.

There are some pretty sophisticated techniques Excel is using when working out what min & max to use, but sometimes we just want to set them to a particular value (normally anything other than 0!).

Here’s a pretty simple set of numbers and the resulting chart we get from Excel (just with all the defaults).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This all looks fine, but let’s change  “C” Monday’s value to 86, now look what happens:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Excel has applied its rules and decided that 0 is a good place to start the chart from, but in this case I lose a lot of the detail and end up with all the lines grouped together.

We could, of course, change the Axis min value to something a bit more sensible, so we’ll use the Format Axis option to set a minimum value of 84:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That looks better!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The base numbers had been entered manually, so being able to type a fixed value into the minimum axis is fine, but what if the numbers were coming from a cube or Sql database? Wouldn’t it be really helpful to be able to drive the minimum value from a range; I can change just about every other thing about the chart but after so many years and so many different version I still can’t do this.

Luckily for me (and our customers!) we already have an Excel addin so we can simply add the functionality to do this using one of the new formulae in 6.5:

XL3SetProperty( ObjectType, ObjectName, Property, Arg1, [Arg2],…, [Arg27] )

The formula to drive the chart axis from a range is simply:

=XL3SetProperty("Chart","Chart 1","YMin",$C$1)

Other options are:

PropertyDescriptionValue
“YMin” or “YMax”Sets the limits of the Y Axis.Numeric
“Y2Min” or “Y2Max”Sets the limits of the Y2 Axis.Numeric
“XMin” or “XMax”Sets the limits of the X Axis.Numeric
“X2Min” or “X2Max”Sets the limits of the X2 Axis.Numeric

Now finally we can build reports (and publish them to the Web), confident that regardless of the data or criteria selected  we aren’t going to end up with a line chart starting at 0 and bunching all the lines together.

This formula can also be used to modify various aspects of our own grids, slicers & small multiples based on the values of excel cells. The kind of things that we and our customers wanted to achieve were things like:

  • Move  dimensions between axes
  • Change the member selection types
  • Modify various grid properties based on different formulae

Lets look how the formula works to do some of these things:

=XL3SetProperty("Grid","My Grid","HierarchiesOnColumns","[Products]","[Regions]", $a$1)

Would move the Product, Region and whichever hierarchy is in $a$1 to the columns (I could use a slicer or drop down to update $a$1 to let the user switch between various hierarchies)

=XL3SetProperty("Grid","My Grid","RemoveEmptyRows",$b$1)

Would toggle whether to display rows without data based on the value of $b$1

If there are any aspects of Excel that you think would be useful to drive from a range, please let us know!

2011 Dashboard Competition

A slight departure from the normal blogging to let everyone know about the latest developments in XLCubed and to talk about a new dashboard competition with the chance to win an iPad 2!

Dashboard Design Competition

XLCubed are sponsoring Dashboard Insight’s first dashboard design contest. The competition is based on a provided data set, and we’d encourage as many as can to enter.

We believe that XLCubed offers a class-leading dashboard development environment, with fine grained control over chart and table sizing, and we’re looking forward to seeing some great dashboards. Take a look at some of our previous winners for inspiration.

Don’t forget that this blog also contains lots of helpful information that should help you come up with a great dashboard design.

We’ll provide entrants with the sample data set in a local cube format to fully exploit the strengths of XLCubed. Entry is open to customers and non-customers alike, and your dashboard skills can win you a shiny new iPad 2. Good luck if you choose to enter.

 

XLCubed v6.5

Version 6.5 is due for release in early October. Originally scheduled as 6.2, we decided it contains so much over the current version that it deserved a bigger billing. New for 6.5 are:

 

  • iPad / iPhone app – XLCubed web reports have always worked on smartphones and tablets. However our app brings an intuitive iPad optimised user experience to report navigation and selection.

  • Mapping – Integrated point and shape based mapping in Excel and on the web.
  • Scheduling – email delivery of XLCubed web reports by pdf or Excel. Schedules can be controlled by period, or by data exception.
  • Sharepoint WebPart – customers have been using XLCubed Web reports in SharePoint for a number of years, but we now introduce a dedicated WebPart to make the process simpler and provide greater flexibility and depth of integration.
  • Away from the headline items there are a number of significant smaller enhancements which make 6.5 another big step forward for us. We’re looking forward to bringing it to market. For an early test drive, contact us along with your specific area of interest at support@xlcubed.com.

Lastly we’d like to welcome Cardinal Solutions Group to our partner program. Cardinal operate in North Carolina and Ohio and are one of a select few Microsoft Managed Partners in the U.S. East and Central Regions. We look forward to working together with new and existing customers.

Warning: Excel can get Volatile

Excel is a great tool for dashboard/report delivery and design (it’s why we created our addin in the first place), but there is a hidden performance trap:

Offset, Now, Today, Cell, Indirect, Info and Rand

If you’ve ever used any of these formulae, you may have noticed that whenever you change a cell, or collapse/expand a data grouping, Excel recalculates. That is because these are VOLATILE formulae, as soon as you use one of these, Excel will enter a mode where everything is always recalculating, and for good reason.

Offset & Now are the formulae we see used most often. Let’s look at each of these in turn and talk about some alternate approaches to avoid this issue.

Offset

This is by far the most common of these danger formulae that we see in use. Here’s the formula definition:

=Offset(reference,rows,cols,height,width)
Returns a reference to a range that is a given number of rows and columns 
from a given reference.

We typically see these as part of a named range definition for driving chart source data – it allows the number of rows/columns driving the chart data to change automatically; a not unusual requirement when it comes to building reports (especially when a report contains some user defined filters or slicers). Here’s an example:

 

 

 

 

 

 

A very simple spreadsheet – we can type the number of months to display in the chart. In reality the number of months to display will probably be driven by the data available for the criteria selected. The screenshot already shows the issue we have –  the chart is setup to display a max of 12 months, but we only have 3 months of data available.

 

The most obvious approach is to use the Offset formula to pick the chart area to use automatically, we could create a named range such as:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now we just change the chart data source to be the named range:

 

 

 

 

The chart is now plotting 3 months, but will automatically update to show the required number of months:

BUT we have now used a volatile formula –  although this is a simple workbook, we are now in a position where Excel is going to have to recalculate everything all the time. It’s probably a good time to look at why Excel is going to do that. Let’s have a look at very simple formula to understand how Excel recalculates things.

Consider the formula:

C1    =A1 + B1

We can see that C1 is dependent upon A1 & B1 – so whenever a value in either of these cells changes C1 will need to be recalculated to show the correct answer. Excel knows about this dependency because it maintains a dependency tree; it knows which cells need to be recalculated whenever any other cell changes. This is a very efficient way of working, if a workbook has thousands of formula, but only one values changes, and this only needs 10 of these formula to recalculate, then only 10 will be calculated.

If C1 contained:

C1    =Sum(A1:A20)

We know that C1 depends upon any of the cells A1:A20, and so does Excel. But what if C1 was:

C1    =Sum(Offset(A1,0,0,B1,1))

Which cells is C1 dependent upon? At a glance you could say A1 & B1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

but  B1 contains the number 20, so actually C1 is dependent upon A1:A20 and B1 (I’ve highlighted the additional cells that are dependent):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just as we can’t see at a glance which cells C1 needs – Excel also can’t easily decide that. Therefore, Offset is volatile because, if it wasn’t then there is a danger that Excel would take so long to work out if it needs to be calculated that it might as well always calculate it.

There is an easy solution to this, INDEX. Here’s the formula definition (be careful, there are 2 ways to use Index, we want the REFERENCE one):

=Index(reference,row_num,column_num,area_num)
Returns a value of reference of the cell at the intersection of a 
particular row and column, in a given range
The big difference, compared to Offset, is that Index is going to return a single cell reference, so you need to use it as part of a range selection A1:Index(…). Here’s the same “Offset” Sum redefined as an “Index”:
C1    =SUM(A1:INDEX(A1:A20,B1,0))

The formula is simply saying the range we want starts at A1 and goes down the number of rows set in B1. The crucial difference is that the Index functions knows that A1:A20 is the maximum range we are likely to look at and therefore the dependencies are known just by looking at the formula itself:

We can now update the Named Range to use the Index function instead:

=Sheet1!$C$6:INDEX(Sheet1!$C$6:$C$17,Sheet1!$D$2,0)

 

 

Now/Today

The Now and Today functions return the current date to a cell – this is generally used so that when a report is loaded it will always show the data based on “Today”. Whilst this is not an unreasonable thing to want to do,  in reality what most people want is for the report to run for the most recent data, which could actually mean a number of things:

  • Yesterday (if the data is built in a nightly process)
  • The last working day (if the source transactional system is only used during office hours)
  • Current month etc.

The easiest solution is to let the data determine the date to use – if we use an XLCubed Grid or Query Table to retrieve the data we can simply setup a grid to retrieve the days/months where there is data:

And use the Sort option “Reverse” to display the most recent data first:

With the grid set to “Refresh on Open”  we know that A6 will always have the most recent date available in the cube and can base the rest of the report off that cell.

Incidentally, V6.2 of XLCubed introduces a new option to Slicers to automatically select the most recent date member when the report is loaded:

Small Multiples on River Quality

The phrase small multiple was popularised by Edward Tufte, and has become a generic term for a visual display using the same chart or graphic to display different slices of a data set. Their close positioning and shared scale make comparisons very easy and shared trends or outliers can be quickly spotted. Various other terms are also used to describe this charting approach, or specific aspects of it, including Trellis Charts, Lattice Charts, Grid Charts and Panel Charts.

The most common use case for small multiples is separate line charts to compare trend across a large number of varying elements. Placing them all within one chart would cause either a ‘spaghetti chart’ , or lots of occlusion as shown in the comparison below. Here we use a standard Excel line chart, and an XLCubed small multiple to chart the same data. Separating the charts while keeping a consistent axis scale makes for a much easier comparison than in the single chart.

We took a slightly different approach when using small multiples to take a look at differences in river water quality across regions of the UK. Our source data was not absolute numeric values, but 14 years of results categorised into four bandings (bad, poor, fair and good). We wanted to provide a ‘one-pager’ which gave a feel for the trend within each region, but also access to the annual breakdown of the different water qualities.

In the end we settled on a Small Multiple display of 100% stacked columns as shown below.

A percentage base seemed a sensible way to approach the data, as different regions will have differing numbers of rivers and of samples taken. Using this approach we’re able to see a comparison of the relative water quality rather than dealing in absolutes.

The user selects a geographic area of the country to view the regional breakdown within the selected area. The water quality for a particular year can be analysed by locating the region, and the specific year to see the percentage breakdown for each of the four categories.

The colouring of the 4 categories was chosen to aid ‘at a glance’ recognition of the overall water quality by region, and also of the trend. Dark blue signifies bad quality water (opaque), and light blue signifies good quality (think ‘you can see right through it….’).

So to read the display overall, or for trend:
• Dark colour signifies water quality problems.
• Light colour signifies good quality water.
• Reading left to right, increasing colour saturation shows declining quality over time.
• Reading left to right, decreasing colour saturation shows improving quality over time.
• Any region can be zoomed in on to see a larger chart and understand the breakdown in more detail.

Fairly quickly, and from just this one display we can draw a number of conclusions as below:
• Across the region, as a broad brush summary, water quality has improved since 1992.
• Doncaster has shown strong and steady improvement.
• Kingston upon Hull has the worst quality overall in the region, and varies significantly year on year.
• If you’re off for a swim in a Yorkshire river, Richmondshire looks a good bet!

We’ve designed a pre-set view in this case to work for the data in question, but the small multiple concept is also very powerful when interactively exploring data. A picture can tell a thousand words as they say – take a look at our youtube videos on small multiples: Video1 Video2

 

Number Formats

One of the main reasons we use Excel is to analyse and display our data, for either our own consumption, or to show to others. In both cases, we want our data to be easily readable, and any important patterns to be immediately obvious.

We use colours, borders and other formatting to highlight important characteristics of our data, and to de-emphasize those features that should stay in the background (see  The Dashboard Squint Test for more). In just the same way, we can use number formats to highlight numbers that are unusual in some way, decrease the focus on uninteresting numbers, or to remove excess detail. Here we recap the essentials of numeric formatting in Excel.

The basics

To apply or change a number format, select the cell or range that needs to be altered, then either:

  • make basic changes (add or remove decimal places, use percentages and so on) using the Number button group on the Home tab (in Excel 2007 and newer),
  • make more advanced changes by right-clicking on the range and selecting the Format Cells option,
  • if you prefer keyboard shortcuts, you can show the format cells dialog by using the Ctrl+1 keyboard shortcut.

From the dialog, you can select some common and very useful formats, including:

  • Number: this allows you to customise the number of decimal places and whether to show thousand separators
  • Date and Time: for formatting dates and times, allowing a variety of shorter and longer options
  • Percentage: format the numbers as percentages, with the desired number of decimal places
  • Custom: allows you to specify your own custom formats (see below)

Simple custom formats

We’ll first go through some simple examples, including some of the standard formats mentioned above, so that in the next section we can build up more complex ones. To enter these formats, follow the steps listed above, then select Custom from the list on the left of the dialog.

  • To show a custom number of decimal places using a number format, write the number you want to show using zeros, for example 0.00 to show your number using 2 decimal places
  • To include digits only if they exist, use a # sign instead of the zero. For example, to only include the part of the number before the decimal if greater than 1 (or less than -1), use #.00
  • To include a thousands separator in the number, use #,###. We use the # symbol to avoid forcing Excel to display unnecessary zeros
  • To format numbers as percentages, just place a % after the format. For example, using the 0.0% format will cause 0.2534 to display as 25.3%
  • To give the numbers a colour, put the name of the colour in square brackets before the format, like this: [Red]0.0

More advanced formats

The formats that we have used so far only use one format for all numbers. In fact, Excel lets us specify four formats: one for positive numbers and one format for negative numbers, one for zeros and one for text – all in one cell. To do this, we use the semicolon to separate the different formats. For example, to format only negative numbers as blue, we can use 0.0;[Blue]-0.0;; In this example, because we have left the other sections blank, zeros will appear as empty cells on the worksheet.

If we combine the pieces of information from the last paragraph, we can find another useful format. Any cells with the ;;; format applied will hide any data in the cell. This can be useful if you want a formula in a particular cell, but don’t want to hide an entire row or column for it.

Another common case is where you have large numbers, but don’t need to see all the digits. In this case, it can be useful to just emphasize the important part of the number, by using this format: 0, This format will round to the nearest thousand, and remove the excess zeros. You can extend this to millions by using another comma, and it’s even possible to include an indicator that the number is shortened like this: 0,,”M”

There are many more special formats available, including changing the boundaries between the semicolons and date and time formats. Have a look at the further reading, below, for more information.

Number formats in XLCubed

XLCubed, being tightly integrated with Excel, allows you to specify number formats in two ways.

  1. For XLCubed value formulas, for example XL3Lookup and XL3ValueRankLookup, the number format of the containing cell can be modified in the way described above. In the same way as any normal Excel-based formula, the format is preserved when the value changes due to changes in your data.
  2. For XLCubed Grids, apply the format as above, then use the right-click menu, and choose Apply Format to Data. This asks XLCubed to maintain the format on the entire slice of your data. More detailed instructions can be found here.

Table of reference

ExampleFormatResult
0.23560.000.24
0.2356#.00.24
123567901235679
1235679#,###1,235,679
0.25340.0%25.3%
435[Red]0.0435.0
500.0;[Blue]-0.0;;50.0
-500.0;[Blue]-0.0;;-50.0
6541.21;;;
15984.1250,16
654915165.5150,,”M”655M

Further reading

Something on the Horizon

We had an interesting scenario while helping a customer extend an existing Excel dashboard.

We had recently performed some work to solve some performance and design issues they had with their existing Analysis Services cubes. They now had more of their underlying data available and the ability to query longer periods without the performance hit (a year’s worth of data vs 28-days).

They wanted to make the most of this by charting changes in daily sales data over the previous 12 months, broken down by their four main business groups. Ideally the chart would become part of the existing Management Report, the difficulty was the lack of report real estate to add the extra information. This is something we have all come across previously and of course typically solved by using In-Cell charts.

Plotting the data on an Excel chart in the space available would give us this:

 

 

Converting to Sparklines gave us a slightly better view, but given the number of data items being plotted still not ideal.

 

 

Luckily our customer had recently upgraded to V6.1 of XLCubed so we were able to use one of our newest incell chart types: SparkHorizons. There is a good explanation of Horizon charts as part of the research paper: Sizing the Horizon: The Effects of Chart Size and Layering on the Graphical Perception of Time Series Visualizations and Stephen Few has covered them previously.

Essentially a line chart is split into colored bands – degrees of blue for positive numbers and degrees of red for negative numbers. In XLCubed this is 3 bands of each colour. The separation of the vertical scale means that horizon charts can be a lot more effective than standard sparklines where the scale of the numbers vary significantly, but you still want to retain a common scale view.

In this case plotting the same data as horizon charts makes things a lot clearer:

It now becomes quite clear when sales a trending up vs down. It’s also possible to flip the negative values so they appear on the same direction as the positive values:

 

We are always looking at ways of developing and extending XLCubed, SparkHorizons were added because they looked like they had the potential to be useful where the data suited them, so it was pleasing to be able to use them in a real-world situation.

It’s also worth mentioning that although, in this case the data came from Analysis Services Cubes, because they are available as Excel formula they can be used to plot any Excel data, here’s an example of the formula:

=XL3SparkHorizon(Sheet1!$V$2:$V$262,Sheet1!E10)

This will plot the data from Sheet1!$V$2:$V$262 as a SparkHorizon graph in Sheet1!E10.

 


“Prev” and “Next” in XLCubed Slicers

We’ve been asked a few times in the last couple of months if we can build a ‘Previous / Next’ selector for date hierarchies, which allows the user to quickly navigate sequentially through months or days. The answer is of course ‘yes’,  otherwise it would be a very short blog..

One of the key strengths of XLCubed is it’s tight integration with Excel, and it means that with some creative thinking the answer is very rarely  ‘no you can’t’. Here we use a combination of our slicers, the xl3membernavigate function, and standard Excel formulae to produce a very effective selector for just this scenario.

A working example of this which connects to the sample bicycle sales local cube which we  ship with the product is available here or you can view the online demo here.

There are a couple of key things to note with this approach:

1) Slicers are typically populated direct from the cube, which makes them very flexible and dynamic. However a less well known aspect is that slicers can be driven from an excel range, and in this case that’s what we’ll be doing.

2) XL3MemberNavigate(). A fairly new formula which allows you to traverse a hierarchy dynamically in a multitude of different ways. Here we just scratch the surface.

To begin with we need to prepare a range of cells in Excel to base the slicer on, in this case the months, and we also need to ensure it’s dynamic and can change with the underlying data structure.  We need to prepare a table of similar structure to the below.

Cell B2 is the selection made by the user in the slicer, which we’ll come back to. The other columns in the table show:

Description:

Logical description of what the row is

Month:

The month available for selection, determined by whatever the user chooses in the slicer, and the Xl3MemberNavigate formula (Insert Formula – Member Navigate) .

Checked Month:

Validation checks on the month to cater for when the first and last available months are selected.

Slicer Display:

what will be displayed in the slicer dialog for user selection.

The first month uses MemberNavigate to get the first available month. This is very straightforward in the MemberNavigate dialog, and will insert a formula in this syntax: XL3MemberNavigate(1,”[Time]”,”[Time].[Month]”,”FirstMember”). Last month is achieved the same way, but using ‘lastmember’.

Previous and Next are again achieved using MemberNavigate, this time the syntax will be:  XL3MemberNavigate(1,”[Time]”,SlicerData!$B$7,”Previous”).

Displayed month is simply what the user has chosen in the slicer.

 Adding the slicer:

Add a slicer from the XLCubed ribbon (or insert slicer menu in 2003). On the selection tab, choose ‘slicer range’ and select C5:D9 on the table shown above. Then set the slicer Type to be buttons. Lastly, on the settings tab, set the slicer to update cell B2 on the SlicerData sheet.

Optionally, you can also name the slicer and choose to show a title bar, as we have in this example.

On inserting the slicer, you’ll need to resize the control itself, and possibly also the size of the buttons if the data member names are long.

You should now have a slicer which enables Prev/Next selections, along with first and last.

Using the slicer in a report

The slicer isn’t currently connecting to anything, or changing filters within a report. To do that, as it’s not directly connected to a hierarchy in the same way as a standard slicer, we need to go via the excel cell which it updates. So any XLCubed grids or formulae need to reference the cell which the slicer outputs its selection to, in this case in this case SlicerData!$B$2.

In our example we’ve just connected one grid, but there can be as many as required. Our example also gives some sales and costing detail for the main product categories. We also use in-grid sparklines to give a feel for the trend, and these can be drilled or sliced and diced in the same way as a standard grid.

The working example can be downloaded here, or a similar version published to XLCubedWeb used online here.

 

 

Heatmap Tables with Excel – Revisited

We’ve revisited one of our more popular guides Heatmap Tables with Excel as they can be a very effective way of presenting data on a dashboard, and have now updated it for Excel 2010…

This Heatmap Table is designed to show you the revenues and the discounts of a company over the course of one year per product group. The size of a bubble shows the revenue made in a particular month and the bubble color shows the discount rate given. The discount rate has been encoded as a range of green colors, ranging from a light green, for low discounts to a dark green for high discounts. The years and product totals are shown at the right and bottom as an integrated part of the table.

Tufte often talks about the integration of numbers, images and words; I think he’s quite right. A way to achieve this in Excel is to integrate charts into tables, so called graphical tables, a very effective means to show “More Information Per Pixel“.

The heatmap table is based on a regular Excel bubble chart. To integrate a bubble chart into a table the bubbles are positioned in a matrix that has the same row and column layout as our table.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In our case we generate a data series table with one column for the X-Series going from 1-12 for January – December and one column for our Y-Series going from 1-8 for our 8 product groups and one column for revenue.

In the sample spreadsheet we’ve setup some simple excel formula to translate data from the classic grid layout:

to the required format:

Now we can insert the bubble chart:

 

To ensure that the charts fit exactly into the table grid we set Min/Max for the X axis to 0.5/12.5 and for the Y axis to 0.5/8.5. Excel would calculate much larger auto scales otherwise. Also set the Major units to 1 so we can use that later to set some grid lines.

 

Now we remove the legend, the X and Y axis, maximize the plot area and align the chart with the Excel table. As the bubbles are initially too large we have to make them smaller. To control the bubble size go to Data Series Options and scale the bubble size to 50%:

 

This already makes a nice bubble table you could use to reproduce the Twitter Charts.

For the grid lines format your table headers and grid lines with light gray grid lines. Resize the plot area, remove the border and re-position the chart so that the chart and the table grid lines align.

To create the heatmap with different colored bubbles we use the fact that by default Excel does not plot data points for #NA values.  For the heatmap we overlay 8 bubble series, one  series per green shade, and show a revenue bubble only if the value fits into the value range that corresponds with a green shade of our color ramp, otherwise we show #NA.

We divide the range MAX(Discount)..0 into 8 groups to define the colours.

The data series columns use the following formula to test if a discount value corresponds with an interval / colour shade:

=IF(AND($E7>I$6-Step,$E7<=I$6),$D7,NA())

The formula returns the revenue, if the discount values is in the interval defined in the column header I$5.

 

 

Now create the eight data series so that the bubble size refers to the eight columns in the data table:

 

And use the Excel chart styles to pick a colour range – make sure you  remove the border from the chart area.

 

 

And you could use the chart styles to quickly switch between different colours – or customise each series to refine the colors.

You can download a starting point for these files here: HeatmapSample.xlsx. Most of the formulae should adapt to data values that you can feed into the data sheets, including data straight from Analysis Services if using XLCubed grids or formulae.

You can see an interactive version of the Heatmap here – we added a link to some cube data, some Slicers for driving the parameters and then published to XLCubedWeb.

 

 

Flexible time-series graphing from a slicer

We are often asked how to drive a chart from a slicer in XLCubed and how to plot days/months for a month or year. Base case this is fairly straightforward, you can set up a grid which is based on the previous ‘x’ months of a slicer selection for example. The difficulty can be where you want to vary the behaviour depending on which level of the hierarchy the user chooses. This is particularly true where the hierarchy contains semesters or quarters.

The example below shows a technique to handle this complexity and display the chart in a way meaningful to the user in each case. The report is based on a slicer that allows the user to switch between showing the graph data based on quarters, months or days.

You can download the Excel spreadsheet that is used in the example here TimeSeriesGraphFromSlicer

This connects to the Adventureworks demo database which ships with Analysis Services.

The diagram below shows the flow of data from each worksheet showing the final result in the sheet Chart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Workbook Sheet – Chart

This sheet shows the graph based on the data chosen in slicer above it. This switches the graph data between quarters, months and days depending on the slicer selection.

 

Workbook Sheet – GridForChart

This shows the data that will be graphed, depending on the choice made by the slicer selection. In this example it is months July 2001 – June 2002. FY2002 has been selected by the user (in this example Financial Year 2002 runs from July 2001 – June 2002).

Note that cells A10 – A21 contain the value ‘TRUE’ – these cells contain an XL3RowVisible statement as follows:

=XL3RowVisible(B10<>””)

This statement hides rows with no data so that they are not plotted on the graph.

Workbook Sheet – SlicerToMonthDay

This sheet contains the data that is returned by the choice of the slicer in workbook sheet Chart.

User selects a month

The data will be graphed as days. For example, if the user selects July 2002 then the graph will be displayed with each day in July along the x-axis. These are defined in XLCubed as ‘Children of’ the slicer.

User selects a quarter year

The data will be graphed as months in a three month period. For example, the user selects Q1 FY 2003 and the data displayed is for three months from July 2002 – September 2002 as below. These are defined in XLCubed as ‘Descendants of’ the slicer at month. This will be the same when the user picks year, semester or quarter.

User selects a half-year

The data will be graphed as months in a six-month period. For example, the user selects H1 FY 2003. The screenshot below shows the data that will be graphed.

However, it can be seen that the values Q1 FY 2003 and Q2 FY 2003 should not appear on the graph.

Using the Edit Member functionality it is possible to remove these so that they do not appear as points on the graph.

To do this, edit the Date.Fiscal member and click on Advanced tab.

Click on the drop down next to first member – that member set is the resulting data when the user selects H1 FY 2003 and shows the data that is in cells B10 – B43 in sheet SlicerToMonthDay.

 

The screenshot below shows the data that will be subtracted – it is in effect the actual value selected by the user via the slicer alongside the two Fiscal Semester values Q1 FY 2003 and Q2 FY 2003.

 

The GridForChart sheet now shows just the six months that should be graphed. As explained earlier further manipulation using the XL3RowVisible functionality removes blank rows.

 

The screenshot above shows the graph with six months of data for H1 FY 2003 for months July 2002 – December 2002, and the quarters have been dynamically excluded.

The end result is a flexible time selector where the user can choose dates at different levels in the hierarchy, and will always get a meaningful and in-context time series chart.