Category Archives: Blog

Auto refresh in XLCubed Pivot-views and Power BI

Version 9 of XLCubed introduced Pivot-views, which allow our powerful grids, small multiples and slicers to be driven directly from lots of different relational sources.

We also added support for Power BI as a data source, and many of our customers are now using XLCubed on Power BI data for a better in-Excel experience and slice and dice.

Many of you will already be familiar with the data refresh options in Power BI, essentially either a scheduled refresh process, or through the Enterprise Gateway.

With pivot-views we wanted to ensure that  the data refresh process is very straightforward, and to enable business users to benefit from them without worrying about scheduling data flows or getting involved with discussions about gateway configuration. Fundamentally, the data will automatically update when the report is opened or if any of the query parameters change (either by updating a slicer or if an Excel cell-based parameter value changes).

This means the report builder doesn’t have to worry about the latest view of the data as that is all handled automatically without any custom code, manual intervention or IT assistance.

Here is how it works in detail.

First insert a grid and select a relational database as the source.

We are presented with the query designer, we can pick a table and setup a parameter by entering “@productgroup”:

This gives us an option to link that parameter to a cell or directly to a slicer:

We can now design the grid we want to see:

And view the result.

Now, if I update the driving cell:

The query is re-run and the grid (and anything else driven from the data has updated to reflect the new query results):

This automatic handling  of the data refresh continues once the report is published to XLCubedWeb.  Whether accessing from Excel, a browser or the XLCubed Mobile App, the report is based on current data without the need for any additional handling or refresh processing… One less thing for the report designer to worry about, one less thing to go wrong!

How to gauge data through charts – Creating Gauge Charts

A common question that comes up in support for XL Cubed is how to add charts that look like a dial, or a gauge. Something like the below:

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These are actually very easy to make and publish to the web, plus they have the further bonus of adding something different to make your reports look more professional.

Once you have your data ready, add a new doughnut chart and configure it to show the information you want it to.

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This will give you a simple doughnut chart.

 

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Next up, pick the cell that contains the information you want to show in the middle of the doughnut chart and reference it in another cell. For example, in the below example we have the two numbers that make up our doughnut chart in cells B3 and B4. Cell E3 contains the information we want to show in the middle of the doughnut chart.

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As you can see, the formatting is different in E3 to the other cells. This is because we have formatted the cell to show the data how we want it to appear in the chart.

Once we are at this stage, it is just a case of transferring the number to the middle of the doughnut chart. You can do this by selecting the formatted cell, in our case E3, copying it and then paste special as a ‘Linked Picture’ anywhere in the worksheet (we will move it into the chart in the next step).

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The ‘Linked Picture’ appears as a cell but it actually acts like a picture so, lastly, move the picture into the middle of the doughnut chart so it looks how you want it, then, right click on the new picture and select ‘Send to Back’

 

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As the cell is a ‘Linked Picture’ Any changes you make to the cell you copied, formatting or data, will update the image.

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Your Gauge Chart is complete! These charts also look good when published to the web.

 

Report Flexibility, with Control

Sometimes we want to let report users modify the structure of a report but to govern exactly what they can and can’t do. While Grids can be restricted at a granular level to enable and disable functionality, that approach still requires some degree of product knowledge by the user.

XLCubed provides the XL3SetProperty() formula, which enables manipulation of many of the core objects such as Grids, Slicers and Small Multiples. It means report users can have simple slicer selections to change the structure of a report, what’s being displayed in a chart, or to vary the chart type. It gives flexibility within the report, but requires no product knowledge from the end user which can be crucial when delivering web reports on a widespread basis.

One common example of usage is where the hierarchy to be viewed in a grid needs to change based on the measure a user selects (depending on the structure of the cube some measures may not be applicable for all hierarchies). Typically that would need to be handled in two Grids, but we can use XL3SetProperty to bring this together, and also to give user choice on the associated Small Multiple Chart view.

The final published report is shown below:

 

S1

 

If the user selects an “Internet” measure, we show Customer Geography on rows, whereas a “Reseller” measure should show Reseller Type on rows. The same logic applies to the Small Multiple chart. In the screenshot below, the user has selected Reseller Gross Profit as the measure, and ‘Stacked Column’ as the chart type. You can see that the hierarchy on rows has been switched, as has the split within the individual charts, allowing the user to easily vary their view of the data with simple button selectors.

 

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This is implemented through the following key points:

  • A lookup table in Excel to determine what hierarchy is applicable for each measure
  • An Excel list showing the available chart types – this is used in the Chart Type slicer
    • The chart slicer outputs its selection into cell $AG$10
  • The measure slicer is linked directly to the grid and the small multiple, but also outputs its selection to an Excel cell ($A$B4)
  • A vlookup determines which hierarchy to use based on the selected measure
  • Three XL3SetProperty() formulae now control what is displayed based on user selections:
    • $AB$7 – sets the grid rows
    • $AB$8 – sets the small multiple columns
    • $AB$7 – sets the chart type

 

Formulae

 

The approach gives a deep level of access to the key XLCubed reporting objects, and enables controlled flexibility within web and mobile-delivered reports. No programming is needed, just a mid-level understanding of Excel itself, and XLCubed.

This is just one example of what the approach can achieve – it’s really limited only by imagination. See XL3SetProperty() for more detail, or contact us if you’d like the example workbook.

Cell-Linked Decomposition view

In displaying the key and often high level information required, many reports raise lots of additional questions in terms of why a specific number is ‘too high’ or ‘too low’, or how the number is comprised. XLCubed provides lots of ways for power users to further explore and visualise this, but in this blog we’ll take a look at one of the simplest and easiest to implement within a report – a cell-linked decomposition view, or a dynamic breakout.

The scenario below is a fairly straightforward Regional Sales report which will be deployed to management through XLCubed Web. When users click on a sales number for a specific region and month we want to provide them with a ranking to show the top 10 products which were contributing to that revenue. We provide a number of ways to achieve that but this is by far the simplest:

Select any of the values returned in the Grid and then either use the ‘Breakout’ option on the Grid Ribbon, or right click and choose XLCubed – Breakout Value. You now specify where to position the resulting breakout, which hierarchy to decompose the number by, at what level, and how many ranked items to show.

BODialog

 

In this example we’ve chosen the top 10 Products at the SubCategory level. The result is shown below. The green cell in the original grid is the cell the user has selected and is ‘tracked’, so when another cell in the grid is selected the breakout updates accordingly, meaning users can easily explore the makeup of their data.

 

BO Result1

 

The breakout result can be further decomposed by running another breakout, this time on the product subcategory. In the published example below we’ve run an additional breakout showing the top ranked products in the selected subcategory.

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The report user can now simply click on the values which are of interest to see the associated product sales breakdown, and it’s something which can be built in minutes by the report designer.

Finding a needle in a haystack – Member Searching made easy!

Searching for specific elements of large hierarchies can be a real pain in many Analysis Services client tools, and we often hear of it as a major frustration in Pivot Tables where dialogs can be cumbersome and prone to locking up.

XLCubed has both a Quicksearch and an Advanced search in the Member Selector, but in this blog we’ll show how to link the search dynamically to an Excel cell (or a web entry cell on a published report) and to retain the search as a dynamic part of the report rather than a point in time selection.

Let’s say we are a retailer with a large product hierarchy running to tens or hundreds of thousands of products. The naming convention means groups of products can be searched by a partial match on their name, and as a report designer we’d like the users to be able to type the search in as quickly and easily as possible rather than go into a custom search dialog. Here’s how:

Below is the final result in Excel, a simple list-report where the user just types the text they want to search the hierarchy for, and matching products are shown on the rows of the report.

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We start with a regular grid, putting Product Categories on rows, and then in the Member Selector we can either select a specific level or set of data to be searched, or go to the Advanced tab and select the whole hierarchy as shown below.

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In the advanced dialog, click on the binoculars:

Binoculars

 

to add a search, and then in the dialog below you can either type a search term directly in the ‘Search Value’ or reference an Excel cell, in this case $C$3. ‘Search By’ allows you to specify exact match, begins, contains etc.

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At this point it’s worth mentioning that while in this case we are just searching by the name of the product (MEMBER_CAPTION) we could also chose to search by any member properties which exist.

So having done that we simply type the search string into $C$3 and we get the matching products straight away – couldn’t be easier.

To make this available for web deployed reports there are two additional steps:

  • Make $C$3 available for web input. To do that right click on the cell and choose Format cells, and then on the protection tab uncheck ‘locked’.
  • Add a search or refresh hyperlink or button so that the web user can refresh the report when they’ve typed the search term. This can be handled using either XL3Link() or XL3Picturelink and the process is described in our previous blog.

The web version is shown below:

Websearch

Click & Submit!

We’ve had a few queries recently where customers want to provide web reports with a number of slicer choices, and to have the report refresh just once when all selections are made, rather than the default refresh after each selection. It can be achieved in a couple of ways in XLCubed, read on for more…

The key to this approach work is the ‘Wait for Submit on Web’ option on the slicer properties, shown below on the Behaviour tab of the slicer designer:

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This means when the slicer is changed it does not refresh the report straight away, and if you set this on multiple slicers users can then press the ‘submit changes’ button on the toolbar shown below after they’ve made their selections.

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Alternatively, and to make it more obvious for web users you can have them click on some text or an image in the report itself to call the refresh, as in the examples below.

I’ve created a simple report below with five different slicers.  Note the “Refresh“ to the right, created using XL3Link().

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The XL3Link statement is available from the Insert Formula menu on the XLCubed ribbon:

 

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It’s most often used to move the focus to another area of the report while passing parameters to enabled linked-analysis in a multi-sheet report. However, here we can use it to call a refresh.

We can leave the “Link to” parameter blank, and also the Target and Value cells. The last parameter, LinkType calls SubmitChanges on the web, so the syntax will look like below (you will need to update the XL3Link statement to include this parameter):

=XL3Link(,”Refresh”,3)

There is more guidance on the general use of XL3Link on our Wiki at: http://www.xlcubed.com/help/XL3Link

So when we publish our report to our web server we can change the slicer choices as required but it’s only when we click the Refresh button that the report is refreshed.

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If we’d prefer to display an image for the user to click on rather than text we can use XL3PictureLink in a similar way.  When using XL3PictureLink we can display any picture – we’ve used a generic refresh icon but it could easily be a more corporate-applicable image:

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XL3PictureLInk is also available from the Insert Formula menu on the XLCubed ribbon:

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Browse in the window above to locate the Picture file to insert and remember to check the Perform a Submit Changes on Web box.

There is more guidance on XL3PictureLink on our Wiki at: http://www.xlcubed.com/help/Picture_Links

This is the published report using XL3PictureLink, the user makes the required selections and clicks refresh.sub8

 

So it’s as easy as that – two ways to ensure that your users can change multiple slicers on web-published reports before calling the refresh, and without you having to direct them to the standard submit changes on web button.

Bump Charts in XLCubed

So today’s blog is about adding Bump Charts in Excel using v8 XLCubed.

Initially a Bump Chart looks the same as a line chart – the difference is they plot the rank position rather than the actual value.

Let’s imagine that I sell a product in a marketplace with 10 other competitors. I may like to see how the rank position of my product and the competition changes over time to check if I’m gaining or losing market position. It’s a common scenario in pharma, where we have a good customer base.

You will usually want dates on the category axis so the trends are shown across time. The series then holds the items to be compared, in this case the products.

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Our example has been set up with Measures on Headers, Product Categories on Series and Date Calendar on Categories.  For more information on using Small Multiples in XLCubed please visit Small Multiple Charts.

The currently selected measure is Reseller Order Quantities (selected though the Measures slicer)

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for the eleven months prior to April 2008 (selected through the Date slicer)

 

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for a subset of products.

Looking at the bump chart you can see that I’ve selected Road Bikes and Mountain Bikes for easy comparison.  You can quickly see that the rank position for Road Bikes dropped quite dramatically from May 2007, picked up again in September before dropping again in November and rising in December through to February 2008.  The change for Mountain Bikes, on the other hand, was less dramatic, rising and falling slightly, steadying in February 2008 before dropping again the following month.

To create a bump chart just select Line – Bump as the Chart Type on your Small Multiple chart. The neat part is that all the rankings are worked out for you behind the scenes, without the need for lots of complex Excel gymnastics trying to work through the full result set month by month.

Workbook slicers – all for one and one for all!

So this is our second blog on the new features of XLCubed v8 – today we’re going to run through workbook slicers.

Workbook slicers allow the user to create the slicers at the workbook level so that they can be displayed for any/all sheets.

There’s a slicer pane which can be arranged horizontally or vertically and stays in place when you navigate to another sheet.  This means that if you have a multi-sheet workbook you only need to define one set of slicers.  These can then configured to be shown or hidden for individual sheets as required.

Turn the slicer pane on by selecting Workbook slicers from the XLCubed ribbon, Slicers tab:

 

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Within the slicer pane there’s an Add Slicer button – this brings up the standard design form for adding slicers.

The Edit layout button brings up the window below.  It allows you to configure the order in which slicers will appear on the pane, which sheets they will be visible on and the padding between individual slicers.  You can also set a background fill colour from here.

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The screenshot above shows that the Date.Calendar slicer is available on a number of sheets.  Selecting a slicer choice on one sheet will refresh the other sheets where the slicer is also available:

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Once added, you link workbook slicers to your report in the same way as embedded slicers.  You can link directly to grids and other XLCubed objects and output their selection to Excel cell locations for use by formulae.

Their positioning on the web is fixed but if you find the slicers are taking up too much screen space you can make your slicer selections and then use this icon to toggle the Slicer Pane off:

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XLCubed as an alternative to ProClarity

With the launch of 7.1 of XLCubed Excel Edition we introduced the ability to import ProClarity Briefing Books – with support for ProClarity ending this year and many customers looking for a replacement, now is a great time for us to show you how the import works to help move users from ProClarity to an alternate solution.

Importing

Let’s start with importing from ProClarity, we’ve built a simple example briefing book based on the usual AdventureWorks sample cube, it includes a sample grid:

 

a performance map:

 

and a chart:

 

To get to the import option we load Excel and select XLCubed -> Extras -> Import -> Import ProClarity Briefing book. After selecting the file to import we are given a summary of each item that is going to be imported:

 

At this point you can control the resulting worksheet name, as well as switching the type of XLCubed object you’ll end up with. Clicking “Import” will now give us 1 sheet for each briefing page:

 

You’ll notice that the import process has created any required slicers so the report is good to go. You could now also spend a bit more time adding any extra XLCubed functionality to the report such as Incell charts or Excel calculations to leverage the power of Excel or publish to XLCubedWeb for consumption by a wider audience.

The import process is very straight forward and we have some great feedback from our customers regarding the speed and ease that they have been able to migrate users’ reports into XLCubed.

Look out for some more blogs showing other features of XLCubed that will help users transition from ProClarity!

XLCubed V7 & SQL Server 2012

SQL server 2012 has recently been released to manufacturing, and at XLCubed we’re well placed to take advantage of everything that is new in 2012.

SQL 2012 delivers Business Intelligence under the ‘BISM’ umbrella (Business Intelligence Semantic Model). BISM comes in different flavours though:

  • BISM Multi-dimensional
    • (Latest version of Analysis Services as we know it)
  • BISM Tabular
    • In-Memory Vertipaq
    • Direct Query

For client tools, BISM Multi-dimensional is largely the same as connecting to existing versions of Analysis Services, with MDX being the query language. For XLCubed we can leverage what we already have in that respect, and the transition is seamless.

BISM tabular is different though. If you choose to deploy in-memory to Vertipaq, client tools can still use MDX, and as such don’t need significant change, other than to handle the tabular rather than hierarchical data environment. However if the deployment is Direct Query (for example for real-time BI), the only available query language is DAX.

There are best use cases for the different deployment options, but it’s fair to say there is a degree of confusion in the space at the moment about the relative merits of each. We’ll try to shed some light and guidance here over the next weeks and months. As a product though, it’s important for us to support and extend the full range of 2012 BI deployment options, and to make these available and accessible to our customers. That’s exactly what we’ve done for version 7.

XLCubed v7, which releases next month, is a client for both MDX and DAX, and as such provides one consistent client interface in Excel and on the Web which can access any of the SQL 2012 deployment models for BI. We are also adding a much richer relational SQL reporting environment.

We are really pleased with some of the beta feedback we’ve had to date, and if you’d like to trial the beta version contact us at beta@xlcubed.com .

We’re looking forward to releasing the product next month, and will be previewing it at SQL Server Connections next week in Vegas.