Olympics Treemap

The 2012 London Olympics have now finished, and as a UK company we were pleased to see the games were such a success, and of course that team GB did so spectacularly well! We’re looking forward now to the Paralympics in a couple of weeks, and once the dust has settled there we’ll be shipping a new point release of XLCubed in September.

We’ll keep most of the changes under wraps for now, but one item which we are introducing is treemaps. The Olympic medal table gives us a nice opportunity to better understand the medal breakdown through the  new chart type. In XLCubed, treemaps can be produced directly from a cube or from a table held in Excel, as is the case here. The first example below shows the medals split by country and sport. The size of the rectangle depicts the total number of medals, and the colour shows the number of gold medals, the darker the colour the more gold. The numeric values list the total number of medals, then the number of golds. We can see the USA at the top, and that over half their medals came from swimming and athletics, with a bigger percentage of golds in the pool.

Any of the countries can be drilled into for a large view on their medal breakdown, not that we’re partisan of course… , but the view below is for Great Britain (GBR) where the particularly good showing by the cycling team stands out.

Taking a look at the same data split first by sport and then country, it’s easy to see the countries dominating the medals in each sport, and to delve into more detail by sport where required.


 Drilling into Athletics we can see that USA won most medals, and also most gold. Great Britain had just the 6 medals, but 4 were gold and hence the darker colour on their tile.

We’ll be making an interactive version of this available over the next few days.

 

 

Asymmetric grid reporting

A common scenario for Analysis Services reporting  is to want to present different measures for different members,  particularly in budgeting and planning. So I want a grid that shows actuals for previous month, budget for this month and forecasts for future months.

This could be achieved in the cube, by using a “Phasing” measure to switch to the different values but quite often our customers are not in control of the cube structure.

We will look at a way to achieve this from within XLCubed itself by working through an example.

So this is our initial grid – it is currently set to report both Revenue and Discount values across all quarters in 2002 – 2004.

Let’s create a couple of slicers – one for Revenue:

and a similar one for Discounts:

 

The settings tab for Discount slicer is:

You can see that this is a multi-select slicer allows which updates an Excel range with the slicer choices.

The entries in the Excel range are referred to by their ‘Unique Name’ eg for Quarter 2 2004 equates to April 2004.

The settings tab for Revenue is similar except it outputs to different cell locations:

In this example our Discount slicer choices are Quarters 2 & 3 in 2004 and our Revenue slicer choices are Quarter 4, 2004.

Now let’s set up the excluded data – remember that we when reporting Revenue rows we want to exclude the Discount slicer choices and vice versa.

Right-click on the Discount header row and then select Exclude from Display

 

You will now see a red triangle appearing in the corner for the first member of the hierarchy which has excluded data.  If you hover over this cell it displays an additional message that the rows are being restricted by members and that you should right-click to edit axis (it’s the menu option just after grid charts).

 

 

In the Axis Designer window pick the Excluded Slicers tab and click in the lower-half of the window (highlighted) – this is where we are going to define the quarters that are to be excluded on the Time hierarchy.

Select the time hierarchy and then click the box to its right (highlighted in screenshot below) and click the box next to the drop-down so that you can pick the Excel range – in our example it is cells I23 through to I28 (the Revenue slicer choices that we do not want reported as Discounts).  Clicking OK will refresh the report and only show Discounts rows for the quarters selected.

 

We now need to do the same for Revenue so right-click on the row containing the red triangle and set up the Revenue excluded slices in a similar way. Click the icon highlighted to add a new exclusion. This will be cells A23 through to A28 (the Discount slicer choices that we do not want reported as Revenue).

Click on the new exclusion row and then in lower half of screen build up the Revenue exclusion in the same way but remembering to point to the Excel range to cell locations A23 to A28.

You should end up with an Axis Designer window something like this – for Discounts exclude slices in cell locations I23 – I28; for Revenue exclude slices in cell locations A23 –A28.

 

OK to apply these changes and the report now looks like:As you can see the report shows Discounts for Quarters 2 & 3 in 2004 but only shows Revenue for Quarter 4 in 2004 and because everything has been linked to ranges driven by slicers, the user of the report can easily control the switch in measures.