One slicer, two reports!

So today’s blog is going to show you how easy it is in XLCubed to have a slicer driving a grid and a SQL table at the same time.  There may be occasions when some of the information you require for your report is held not in an analysis services cube but a SQL table.  So you’ve created a grid report with a slicer like below:

 

 

This is a simple report with Geography on headers and Product Model Categories on rows showing Reseller Sales Amount with the Country slicer driving the grid.  The slicer is set to update cell B9 with the slicer choice.

 

So I show this to my manager and he asks for some more detail – he wants to know what type of businesses there are in each country, their names and the number of employees.  That’s when I realise that all of this extra information is not in my cube but on a completely separate SQL table.

Not a problem for XLCubed!  I can quickly create a report that includes all this data from the SQL table.  Using the SQL option within Grids & Tables I can create a report that connects to a relational SQL data source.

Create my connection to my data source – I am selecting the AdventureWorksSDW database:

Let’s build up my SQL query – I’m using the DimReseller and DimGeography tables to return the required fields.

My SQL statement is:

Select DimReseller.BusinessType, DimReseller.ResellerName, DimReseller.NumberEmployees, DimGeography.EnglishCountryRegionName From DimReseller Inner Join DimGeography On DimGeography.GeographyKey = DimReseller.GeographyKey

This is great but it returns data for all the countries and I only want to see data for the country chosen through the slicer.  So let’s add a parameter to our SQL query.

If you look at the corner of the SQL query window you will see the parameters area – with a very helpful tip on adding a named parameter.

 

 

Let’s add the following to the end of our SQL query:

where DimGeography.EnglishCountryRegionName = @parm1

Now we can define where the Excel range is for our parameter – in our example it is cell B9.  You remember that this is the cell that the slicer has been set up to output the slicer choice.

So now when we select a country from our slicer eg United States the grid refreshes as well as the table.

 

XLCubed celebrates its 10th anniversary!

It’s hard to believe that it’s now 10 years since we opened for business at XLCubed, and to celebrate we are running a 10th Anniversary competition, with the prize being a shiny new iPad. As a company, we have a constant stream of ideas, but one reason we’ve been successful is that we are genuinely keen to understand how our customers use the products, and to listen to their views.

The competition is very simple, we want your suggestion for one piece of functionality you’d like to see added into the product. Maybe it’s something you’ve wanted for years, or maybe it’s just popped up. It can be anything from the smallest tweak, to a whole new area. The winner gets two prizes – the iPad, and their idea added into the product. Email your idea to myidea@xlcubed.com.

 

A snappy fix for layout problems in Excel

Have you ever tried copying parts of one workbook to another and been restricted by column widths?  Or maybe you’re almost done with a report layout only to find that the last table you need to add has 4 columns, where there is only room for 3?  Today we’re going to show you how to use Excel’s Camera tool to get around any Excel column width limitations to achieve your dashboard goals!  Here we have an Excel heat Map on a separate sheet in our workbook.

It has been inserted into the dashboard below where the first thing to notice is the workbook’s  variable column widths, in particular columns J and K.  If we had just inserted our heat map as it was, the column widths in our dashboard would determine the width size of the heatmap.    Instead we used Excel’s camera tool to insert our heatmap sized at exactly what we wanted, regardless of the destination sheet’s column widths.

 

We follow these simple steps:

  • select  the heat map in the source sheet
  • click the Camera Tool icon
  •  navigate to the destination sheet
  • click and insert exactly where you want

The Excel Camera Tool is also a great way creating dynamic screenshots of particular groups of data.  The Camera Tool takes a picture of a selected area, and you can then paste that picture wherever you want it. It updates automatically, and because it is a picture rather than a set of links to the original cells, any formatting or data change in the source is automatically reflected in the picture.

The heat map chart source figures have been updated to show Europe’s higher sales – as you can see Europe now has the greater sales:

 

The dashboard heat map has updated automatically to reflect this value change.

 If you can’t see the Camera Tool on your Excel menu you can easily attach it to your Quick Access Toolbar by performing the following steps:

  • Click the File Tab
  • Click Options
  • Choose the Quick Access Toolbar Option
  • In the ‘Choose Command From’ dropdown, select Commands not in Ribbon
  • Find the Camera Tool from the alphabetical list of commands and add it to the Quick Access Toolbar.