PowerPivot, SQL R2, Sharepoint 2010, Office 2010.

So we’ve been using PowerPivot for a while now, and Office 2010 has been part of our lives for some time. I’ll use this blog to answer some of the questions that keep cropping up in conversation with our customers:

1. Does XLCubed work with Excel (Office 14) 2010?

a. Yes, we’ve been using it since the first CTP release and each release since then.

2. Can I use XLCubed Web with SharePoint 2010?

a. Yes, publishing to the web and embedding the reports within your SharePoint site works in exactly the same way as with previous versions.

3. Does XLCubed connect to PowerPivot?

a. Yes, XLCubed connects to the PowerPivot published cubes, and our client tools can be used to build reports and dashboards from them.

4. Can I build reports from SQL Server R2 using XLCubed?

a. Yes this will work just fine, just as you can build reports from previous version of SQL or other relational sources. (here is an example)

PowerPivot in the real world

The services team have been working on migrating some of our internal models and sample databases across to a PowerPivot environment – looking at the pros and cons, using DAX rather than MDX to perform some calculations. Results have been varied, its been interesting to see some features that we’ve had for a while (like cube formulas, slicers and web parameters) appear in a similar way in PowerPivot.

Quite clearly PowerPivot isn’t the be all and end all or anything like a replacement for Analysis Services, but it certainly has a role for tactical solutions, some power user analysis, and we think likely also for RAD prototypes of larger scale AS implementations. It doesn’t venture into the gap left by PerformancePoint Planning (as many thought it would in early 2009) – we’ve moved to address this area with the XLCubed PM suite that uses in memory OLAP cubes and/or Analysis Services.

Trying out some of the tools

Here’s a few download sets for you to try, take careful note of the hardware spec and requirements for the MS ones though:

The 2010 Information Worker Virtual machine

Register and Download Office 2010

PowerPivot 32Bit, 64Bit

XLCubed Evaluation

If you would like to evaluate against your own data – contact the XLCubed Product team for evaluation editions or if you want to try a no risk proof of concept or prototype contact the XLCubed consulting team.

Data Visualization – a real world example

In the following example we work through a real world example of a data visualization. We’ve chosen an example that involves Operations data – this is fairly non-domain specific so hopefully it can demonstrate some important points. The first, and most important point is that you have to define your audience.

We receive many questions about “what is the best chart for this situation” or “what colour should I use for emphasis”. These questions are usually attacking the problem from the wrong angle. The one question you need to ask before anything else is “who is this visualization going to be seen by and how?” Is it in a boardroom on a printed sheet or across a trading floor on a plasma screen. Are the consumers domain experts?

This example features data about an investment bank’s operations processing, the audience being the clients of the Operations department.

Starting Point

Initially the project started out as simply trying to record what operational problems were encountered on a daily basis across different product lines. A reporting system was built and various generic reports produced:

DVBlog1

Unfortunately the reports either didn’t contain data at a granular enough level or it was difficult for the product managers to see where the issues were occurring and what the trends were. In reality the report showed what the major problems had been – unfortunately this was already known, as when something major goes wrong you remember getting shouted at!

What was requested

The client wanted a report that showed where the problems were occurring across business lines (rather than operational units) and how they were doing historically in a single page that could be included in a weekly MIS pack (they currently had four pages per product line (8) so a total of 32 pages. As a first pass they simply wanted an Excel worksheet they could update manually:

DVBlog2

We felt this solution lacked clarity and it was very difficult to spot trends across products.

What we proposed

We designed a solution using MicroCharts to allow small multiples of charts to show a variety of views:

DVBlog3

This solution allowed the user to view the data simply as a cumulative set of data by Product (top line) or by Root Cause (vertically) and then look deeper into historical trends in the centre of the chart. For example, its fairly easy to see spikes in the Root Cause data historically and see that the overall trend has improved over time. By ranking the Products and Root Causes you immediately give some sense of scale to the data. For example you can see that there are many more Application failures than any other type of problem, but the majority of root causes are otherwise fairly evenly distributed.

One other point worth noting was that the original colour scheme was much more muted, but the client got very upset that it looked like a competitor’s corporate colour and wanted it to be “louder”.

What was the user reaction…

Ecstatic, 1 page replaced 34 and they could see at a glance how the entire (large) organisation was working but also quickly find out detail for a particular area and identify trends.